The Photographs of Marion Post Wolcott

GBP £7.95

Specification

Paperback

ISBN: 978-1-904832-41-6

64 Pages

180 × 180 mm (7 ⅛ × 7 ⅛ in)

55 colour and b&w photographs

In association with the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

September 2008

Description

“I was given freedom to—well, document America.”—Marion Post Wolcott

“What you see from the photographs is that Post’s range was wider than might be supposed from an acquaintance limited to her more familiar images. Everywhere are surprises and experiments that, in all likelihood, never occurred to her as being in the least bit experimental.”—Francine Prose on Marion Post Wolcott

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The approximately 172,000 film negatives and transparencies in the Library of Congress’ collection from the Farm Security Administration (FSA), later the Office of War Information (OWI), provide a unique view of American life during the Great Depression and World War II. This government photography project, headed by Roy E. Stryker, employed many relatively unknown names who later became some of the 20th century’s best-known photographers.

Marion Post Wolcott was born in Montclair, New Jersey, in 1910, and educated at the New School for Social Research, New York University, and at the University of Vienna. Upon graduation in 1932, she returned to New York to pursue a career in photography and attended workshops with Ralph Steiner. By 1936, she was a freelance photographer for Life, Fortune, and other magazines. She became a staff photographer for the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin in 1937 and remained there until Paul Strand recommended her to Roy Stryker at the Farm Security Administration, where she worked from 1938 to 1942. She died in 1990.

Each volume in the Fields of Vision series features an introduction to the work of a single FSA/OWI photographer by a leading contemporary author or writer, and presents 50 striking images that show how the particular vision of these photographers helped shape the collective identity of America. Their evocative pictures transport the viewer to American homes, farms, and streets of the 1930s and 1940s, while offering a glimpse of a new narrative and intimate style that was later to blossom on the pages of post-war magazines. For many Americans of the pre-television age, the diversity and complexity of their country was defined by the lenses of these men and women.

Author biographies

Francine Prose is the author of twenty-one works of fiction, including the New York Times bestseller Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932A Changed Man, which won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize; and Blue Angel, a finalist for the National Book Award. Her works of nonfiction include Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and the New York Times bestseller Reading Like a Writer. The recipient of numerous grants and honours, including a Guggenheim, a Fulbright, and a Director’s Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, she is a former president of PEN American Center and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Series Editor Amy Pastan is an independent editor and book packager. She was formerly a staff editor at
the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and acquisitions editor at the Smithsonian Institution Press, where she developed volumes on photography and fine arts.

Table of contents

  1. Preface by W. Ralph Eubanks, former director of publishing, Library of Congress
  2. Introduction by Francine Prose
  3. Photographs
  4. Image credits